A Very Nice Man and His Siatka

By | Action today, Featured Post, In the News, Sustainable Living, Uncategorized, W2O Blog

FullSizeRenderA very nice man, Dr. Stan Szyfelbein (pronounced Shi-fell-bine) told me today that when he shops here and in his native Poland, he uses all different sorts of reusable bags. His favorite is what he calls a “siatka.” Siatka is Polish for “anything that has the appearance of a net.” Stan, a wise man of 81, and retired Chief of Anesthesia at Shriners Hospital here in Boston says “Bags need to be functional and fashionable. Every man and woman use to carry a siatka rolled up in their pocket when they went shopping.”

The cotton siatka (or today’s string bag) is durable, washes easily and can be very beautiful too. Here are some wonderful examples of siatkas to add to your repertoire of reusable bags. Nix the plastics! Good for you, good for our oceans.

Pinterest has bags to own and to make!

Pinterest has bags to own and to make!

Ecohip cotton string bag on amazon.com

Ecohip cotton string bag on amazon.com

 

 

 

www.estringbags.com.au

www.estringbags.com.au

FullSizeRender

Happy Holidays from W2O

By | Action today, Featured Post, Sustainable Living, Uncategorized, W2O Blog
Barb uses paper bags and gifts of her garden to wrap her holiday presents!

Barb reuses paper bags and gifts of her garden to wrap her holiday presents!

A Holiday message from W2O Chair Barbara Burgess

“I have such deep respect and appreciation for our world’s oceans.  It brings my family and me joy and peace.  And when I think about the millions and millions of mouths that the oceans feed I am filled with gratitude.  As a mother, it feels natural to protect what I love.  So when I think about the holiday season and gift giving it simply feels right to give a gift that says,”Together we will save our great blue planet!”  All of us at W2O would like to share these fun gift ideas with you and hope they may spark action and conversation this Holiday season.”

Yours in the spirit of a healthy planet,
Barbara

Your choices make a difference—whether it’s a fun outing, a gift for a child or ocean lover or, the recipes you cook at your home!

Get on board!
Upcycle plastic pollution in our oceans; the Bureo skateboard is made of recycled fishing nets gathered off the Chilean coastline.
http://neaq.ordercompletion.com/a556/minnow-complete-cruiser-skateboard.html

Surprise someone with an Animal Encounter!
Give a memorable experience and also provide vital support to the New England Aquarium’s conservation and research mission.
http://www.neaq.org/visit_planning/tours_and_programs/programs/index.php

Live life with less polluting plastic!
We all love our yogurt but hate using all those plastic containers. Make your own yogurt (easy!) save money and nix the plastic! http://www.amazon.com/Euro-Cuisine-YM80-Yogurt-

Eat sustainable fish!
This cookbook, by W2O friend author and chef, Barton Seaver, provides simple, delicious, sustainable recipes that are good for the planet.
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/for-cod-and-country-barton-seaver/1101074324

Learn about protecting sea turtles!
Each purchase of Liz Cunningham’s book, Ocean Country, creates a donation of 21% of the book’s royalties for the New England Aquarium’s Marine Conservation Action Fund. MCAF is a unique and effective micro-funding program that protects and promotes ocean animals and habitats.
http://lizcunningham.net/ocean_country_the_book/

Think big!
Give a North Atlantic right whale sponsorship. With fewer than 600 North Atlantic right whales alive today, New England Aquarium researchers are working tirelessly to study and protect this critically endangered species.
http://www.neaq.org/membership_and_giving/individual_donations/animal_sponsorship/right_whale_sponsorship.php

Build Awareness!
The beautiful Nurdle in the Rough jewelry was created with the goal of building awareness about plastic pollution. Each piece is carefully crafted from found plastic near artist Kathleen Crabill’s home in Hawaii. 10% of the proceeds is donated to ocean conservation efforts. http://www.nurdleintherough.com

 

From Nurdle in the Rough

From Nurdle in the Rough

 

 

Heroes of the Oceans

By | Uncategorized | No Comments

Join us to celebrate the real heroes of the ocean! Across the country it is the towns and municipalities that have stepped up to the plate, done the dirty work and pushed for action to ban single-use plastic pollution. Massachusetts has 18 towns that have bans on plastic bags, bottles and polystyrene and on November 12, along with the Massachusetts Sierra Club and the office of Rep. Lori Ehrlich, Women Working for Oceans will host Heroes of the Ocean  to honor their hard work. This event is FREE and open to the public.

image001

Sea Level Rise-Why Worry Now?

By | Events, Featured Post, In the News, Sustainable Living, W2O Blog | No Comments
Photo by Noelle Anderson

Photo by Noelle Anderson

Is sea level rise something we need to be concerned about right now? If you look at the data from the Union of Concerned Scientists, it seems far off somehow yet, we are seeing the water rise and cities and towns are talking about mitigation to protect vulnerable property. So what is going on? What action can we take?

Sea level rise, caused by human induced climate change, amplifies the effects of tidal height and storm surge associated with all coastal storms. A storm doesn’t need to be “super” to cause significant damage. Most people remember Hurricane Sandy. The iconic images of the massive storm taken by satellite; the bent and twisted frame of the drowned roller coaster sitting placidly in the surf just off the Jersey Shore; the flooded tunnels of the New York City subway system and lower Manhattan are hard to forget. Similarly, we shudder at the memory of New Orleans residents clinging to their roofs awaiting rescue by helicopters during Hurricane Katrina. Yet, we also tend to dismiss such happenings as anomalies. We call them “super storms “ or “100-year storms” and unless we were directly impacted, go on with our lives.

Because of warming seas from human induced climate change, scientists warn that 100-year storms are becoming more frequent. Coastal flood advisories and flood watches due to “astronomical tides” were in effect recently in locations from Key West to Maine, including Boston, Baltimore, Washington, DC, and other cities in between. In the southern part of Florida, a third night of flooding closed roads, flooded sidewalks and led to some of the most extensive tidal flooding they’d ever witnessed. Charlestown has seen consecutive days with road closure due to flooding and lives were lost due to rising waters. Last month’s king tide saw alligators swimming in flooded streets.

One constant piece of this phenomenon, the monthly ebb & flow of the tide, is just doing what it does, albeit with an extra kick when there is a king tide. With sea level rise, the highest tides are only getting higher, due to the thermal expansion caused by the increasing warm air and water and the flooding they bring is getting more frequent. Regardless of whether you live along the coast or in the nation’s heartland, the impact will be both economic and geographic.

Many of our most populous metropolitan areas are located where the ocean meets the land. In fact more than 100 million people live in coastal counties. These counties produce 42 percent of the US economy’s GDP. Besides being financial, military and government centers, these areas are home to the largest ports in our country. A quick glance at the list of the top five ports in the continental US, illustrates the vulnerabilities. They are located in Louisiana, Texas, New York/New Jersey, and account for billions of metric tons in movement of goods, both exports and imports, annually. In the past decade, each one has been impacted by a significant meteorological event, either Sandy or Katrina, and is located in a low-lying area impacted by tidal flooding and sea level rise.

When storms arrive, airports, cargo ports and financial centers close halting the movement of goods and people, slowing the economy and impacting people’s livelihoods. When land is washed away or homes and businesses are destroyed by floodwater, people’s life savings are threatened; they may be left homeless and jobless. These impacts will be more frequent as sea levels rise and storms become stronger.

What can we as ordinary citizens do to help prepare and protect our family, communities, and our society for sea level rise?

  • Be educated. By learning all that we can about climate change and sea level rise, we can support efforts to stem the tide.
  • Be prepared. Make sure our families are ready for a big storm by having a plan and the necessary items on hand to make sure we stay safe.
  • Be inspired to take action. Support legislation that demands action on climate change and reduce your own carbon footprint. Having a home energy audit is a great place to start!

Join us for Boston Waters Rising on October 29th and learn more!

Today’s blog contributor is W2O board member Dianne Brown

Terms Defined

Storm Surge occurs when the winds from coastal storms push water inland. It occurs at all tide levels, but causes the most damage at high tides and king tides. In other words, the higher the water level at the time of the surge, the more water will be pushed inland, resulting in greater flooding. The greater the flooding, the longer it will last, simply because the water will take longer to drain away. The longer the flooding lasts the more human suffering and economic damage it will inflict.

A King Tide The height of a tide is controlled by the gravitational pull of the moon on the earth, which varies during the month, as the moon waxes and wanes. The tide is highest when we have a full moon or a new moon. A king tide occurs several times during the year when the moon’s elliptical orbit brings it closest to the Earth at the same time the Earth’s elliptical orbit brings it closest to the sun.

Sea Level Rise is an increase in the level of our oceans, relative to the land. It is generally measured in three ways: satellite data, tide gauges, and land benchmarks. Sea level rise is occurring because of two phenomena – the absorption of additional heat in our atmosphere by the ocean and the melting of land ice (glaciers & ice sheets). Although scientific estimates vary about the amount of sea level rise we will experience, due to uncertain rates of land ice melt, climate scientists all agree that globally seas have risen an average of 8 inches since 1880 and that they will continue to rise from their present level.

 

The Coolest Kitchens are Plastic Free

By | Action today, Featured Post, Sustainable Living, W2O Blog | No Comments

Getting plastic, especially single use, out of your kitchen doesn’t have to be inconvenient, expensive or a drag. A tiny bit of thought and some help from our plastic free links will set you on your way to living without single use plastic. Once the bug has taken hold, you won’t look back. Good for you, Good for the Oceans.

Facts about Plastic Pollution from 5 Gyres
Plastic Free Living
Plastic Free Product Links
Storage and Gear
Bioplastics-Are they really “GREEN”

Image

 

Mother’s Day (or any day) Picnic Perfect! Plastic Free

By | In the News, Sustainable Living, Uncategorized, W2O Blog | No Comments

Thinking of a picnic outing on Mother’s Day?  Make your picnic perfect and plastic free! Plastic is forever! And because it breaks down over time into small pieces, most of it ends up in our waterways and finally our oceans, where it is mistaken for food by the fish that we in turn eat.

A Perfect Picnic along the Charles River, Boston

A Perfect Picnic along the Charles River, Boston

Below are some fabulous links to W2O’s favorite plastic free websites to inspire you to nix the plastic and bring reusables when planning your day at the beach or picnic in your community.  Newly marketed “bioplastics” are not the answer here. Products that are promised to be green aren’t neccesarily compostable unless they are disposed of properly. Lesley McClurg for Capital Public Radio (full article here) explains, “You might buy the tableware believing it’s better for the environment. But, that depends on where you toss it out.” So beware! Products marked “compostable” might not be the best choice.

Consider using stainless steel cutlery and glass containers for your day out. Packing with a bit of thought adds flair, sophistication and makes a ho hum event special. Think about using a wicker basket and lovely blanket with glasses and plates or simply use an old bedspread, reusable bag and any covered containers that you can easily pack and then bring home. Nix the plastics and show off some innovative creativity and style. Start a conversation with your guests about why you made the choice to make your picnic perfect and plastic free!

Photo: foodimentary.com

Photo: foodimentary.com

 

Eco Lunchbox has a great selection of beautiful lunch boxes and bags complete with utensils and cloth napkins.

ecolunchbox-picnic-abes

Snazzy ideas from Eco Lunchbox

Life without Plastic has a variety of economical cool plastic free options. Check out their sale items.

Life Without Plastic! the good life!

Life Without Plastic! the good life!

 

 

 

 

 

 

This hamper, although a bit pricey, is a classic from Crate and Barrel and will last you a lifetime.  Careful that you don’t get sucked into the melamine and acrylic gear marketed alongside the basket. Instead opt for the cool class bottle! Cheers! peterboro-handmade-picnic-basket

And finally, check out the following links to learn more about plastic pollution and the easy steps you can do to start living a plastic free life:

Surfrider Foundation: Rise Above Plastics
Center for Biological Diversity: Ocean Plastic