Get Ready for W2O’s Event on Ocean Noise April 7th

By | Events, Featured Post, Uncategorized

On April 7th, W2O, along with the New England Aquarium will present Beeps, Rumbles, and Blasts: How Human -Generated Noise Threaten Marine Life. Scientists Chris Clark and Scott Krauss will educate us about how shipping, seismic testing and other human generated noise create a cacophony of sound drowning out the voice of whales, dolphins and all marine life communicating to each other during feeding, migration, breeding, and while detecting predators.

A Very Nice Man and His Siatka

By | Action today, Featured Post, In the News, Sustainable Living, Uncategorized, W2O Blog

FullSizeRenderA very nice man, Dr. Stan Szyfelbein (pronounced Shi-fell-bine) told me today that when he shops here and in his native Poland, he uses all different sorts of reusable bags. His favorite is what he calls a “siatka.” Siatka is Polish for “anything that has the appearance of a net.” Stan, a wise man of 81, and retired Chief of Anesthesia at Shriners Hospital here in Boston says “Bags need to be functional and fashionable. Every man and woman use to carry a siatka rolled up in their pocket when they went shopping.”

The cotton siatka (or today’s string bag) is durable, washes easily and can be very beautiful too. Here are some wonderful examples of siatkas to add to your repertoire of reusable bags. Nix the plastics! Good for you, good for our oceans.

Pinterest has bags to own and to make!

Pinterest has bags to own and to make!

Ecohip cotton string bag on amazon.com

Ecohip cotton string bag on amazon.com

 

 

 

www.estringbags.com.au

www.estringbags.com.au

FullSizeRender

Ring in Hopeful Action 2016 for our Climate

By | Action today, Featured Post, Sustainable Living, Uncategorized, W2O Blog | No Comments
Lilly Davidson from Libby

Photo: Libby Davidson

With all our worrying world issues, it’s hard to keep climate on our minds. New Years’ resolutions often include topics of health, happiness, wealth, safety and security. Of course, all of these are directly tied to the success of our planet and climate. A healthy planet gives us joy, feeds us, and provides us with our precious natural resources, which dictates economic stability.

Should we be more hopeful about the future of our climate in 2016? Books will be written about whether or not the Paris21 Climate talks will lead to real action for curbing human emissions that contribute to climate change. Arguments will ensue about whether or not we are doing enough, quickly enough, to make an impact. Some will move on in hopes that others will continue the discussion and come up with the answers. But 2016 will be an important climate year and W2O will be encouraging you to stay hopeful and act.

Hashtags are not enough. Sometimes you have to write a letter or make a call to get someone’s attention.  W2O often asks its members and event attendees to write or call their elected government officials to encourage the passing of legislation that protects our oceans. Does it make a difference? According to legislative aids at the Massachusetts State House: Yes! Letters and calls keep topics on the minds of legislators encouraging research that contributes to the process of pushing a bill through to success.

More tips for your action on climate in 2016:

We are often asked, “What can I do?” Here are some tips from the New England Aquarium and the New York Times on how you can help curb carbon emissions:

  • Eat vegetables and cut down on intake of meat and dairy. The production of meat and dairy is carbon intensive.
  • Take the bus, ride a bike or walk.  If you drive to work alone, your commuting eats up more than your entire carbon budget for the year. 
  • Shop wisely, avoid waste.  Wasted food adds to the total amount of the food that is produced.  A large portion of wasted food ends up in landfills and, as it decomposes, adds methane to the atmosphere.
  • Fly less, drive less. Take the train or bus. If you do fly, avoid first class.  On average, a first class seat is two and a half times more detrimental to the environment than coach because it takes up more room resulting in more flights.
  • Reduce your mileage input by driving the speed limit. Tune your engine, keep tires inflated and avoid buying that third car.
  • Buy less stuff; waste less stuff.  Each thing that you recycle is one fewer thing that has to be produced.
  • Advocate public policies that develop clean energy and efficient transportation.  Vote with the oceans in mind.

Good for you. Good for our oceans.

 

Happy Holidays from W2O

By | Action today, Featured Post, Sustainable Living, Uncategorized, W2O Blog
Barb uses paper bags and gifts of her garden to wrap her holiday presents!

Barb reuses paper bags and gifts of her garden to wrap her holiday presents!

A Holiday message from W2O Chair Barbara Burgess

“I have such deep respect and appreciation for our world’s oceans.  It brings my family and me joy and peace.  And when I think about the millions and millions of mouths that the oceans feed I am filled with gratitude.  As a mother, it feels natural to protect what I love.  So when I think about the holiday season and gift giving it simply feels right to give a gift that says,”Together we will save our great blue planet!”  All of us at W2O would like to share these fun gift ideas with you and hope they may spark action and conversation this Holiday season.”

Yours in the spirit of a healthy planet,
Barbara

Your choices make a difference—whether it’s a fun outing, a gift for a child or ocean lover or, the recipes you cook at your home!

Get on board!
Upcycle plastic pollution in our oceans; the Bureo skateboard is made of recycled fishing nets gathered off the Chilean coastline.
http://neaq.ordercompletion.com/a556/minnow-complete-cruiser-skateboard.html

Surprise someone with an Animal Encounter!
Give a memorable experience and also provide vital support to the New England Aquarium’s conservation and research mission.
http://www.neaq.org/visit_planning/tours_and_programs/programs/index.php

Live life with less polluting plastic!
We all love our yogurt but hate using all those plastic containers. Make your own yogurt (easy!) save money and nix the plastic! http://www.amazon.com/Euro-Cuisine-YM80-Yogurt-

Eat sustainable fish!
This cookbook, by W2O friend author and chef, Barton Seaver, provides simple, delicious, sustainable recipes that are good for the planet.
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/for-cod-and-country-barton-seaver/1101074324

Learn about protecting sea turtles!
Each purchase of Liz Cunningham’s book, Ocean Country, creates a donation of 21% of the book’s royalties for the New England Aquarium’s Marine Conservation Action Fund. MCAF is a unique and effective micro-funding program that protects and promotes ocean animals and habitats.
http://lizcunningham.net/ocean_country_the_book/

Think big!
Give a North Atlantic right whale sponsorship. With fewer than 600 North Atlantic right whales alive today, New England Aquarium researchers are working tirelessly to study and protect this critically endangered species.
http://www.neaq.org/membership_and_giving/individual_donations/animal_sponsorship/right_whale_sponsorship.php

Build Awareness!
The beautiful Nurdle in the Rough jewelry was created with the goal of building awareness about plastic pollution. Each piece is carefully crafted from found plastic near artist Kathleen Crabill’s home in Hawaii. 10% of the proceeds is donated to ocean conservation efforts. http://www.nurdleintherough.com

 

From Nurdle in the Rough

From Nurdle in the Rough

 

 

Heroes of the Oceans

By | Action today, Events, Featured Post, In the News, Past Events, Sustainable Living, Uncategorized, W2O Blog | No Comments

W2O and the Massachusetts Sierra Club hosted Heroes of the Oceans at the MA State House last week, honoring those that have helped pass bills banning single use plastic pollution in their towns and cities.

Educating about refusing single use plastic is not enough. The real heroes are those that take up the challenge in their communities and enacting lasting change through legislation. Mindful change matters, but those changes that spark local, city and statewide initiatives, that is what its all about.

Plastic pollution clogs our drains, litters our parks, destroys our oceans and then ends up in us. The plastic ends up in us.

Our Heroes of the Oceans made endless phone calls, spent hours explaining the damage that single use plastic does to our environment, oceans and families, and convinced town chamber, town meeting members, selectman and legislators that now is the time to act and ban single use plastic in our communities. It is hard work getting that done.

 

Best Honorees

The “Heroes” with legislators on the grand staircase at the MA State House (photo: Gretchen Powers)

Heroes of the Oceans

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Join us to celebrate the real heroes of the ocean! Across the country it is the towns and municipalities that have stepped up to the plate, done the dirty work and pushed for action to ban single-use plastic pollution. Massachusetts has 18 towns that have bans on plastic bags, bottles and polystyrene and on November 12, along with the Massachusetts Sierra Club and the office of Rep. Lori Ehrlich, Women Working for Oceans will host Heroes of the Ocean  to honor their hard work. This event is FREE and open to the public.

image001

Microbeads: A Billion in our Oceans and Counting

By | Action today, Featured Post, In the News, Sustainable Living, Uncategorized, W2O Blog | No Comments
Photo: cleanbodiesofwater.org

Photo: cleanbodiesofwater.org

Yes, they might be in your toothpaste, face wash, and spa-like exfoliant! Micro beads, tiny plastic particles that give that buffing component to your products and then marketed as making you squeaky clean, are rinsed off of your body, enter our waterways and end up in our oceans. “By the billions,” according to Rachel Abram’s research for the poignant article in the New York Times “Fighting Plastic Bead Pollution.” 

“Once dispersed into the ocean, everything from plankton to whales is ingesting these plastics,” said Tanya Cox, Marine Plastics Officer with Fauna and Flora International (FFI). “In the water, they attract persistent environmental toxins, such as DDT, which work their way up the food chain until they are ultimately consumed by humans. All of a sudden, this not only becomes a pressing environmental issue but one that could directly affect humans.”

photo: savethewater.org

photo: savethewater.org

So, what can you do? Start by saying no to single use plastic and by making sure that your special products don’t include the plastic ingredients that are polluting you and our oceans.

“Checking really is easier than it sounds,” according to the special “Good Scrub Guide” produced by FFI and its partners, Surfrider International and Marine Conservation Society. “Just take a peek at the ingredient list on the back of your product. polyethylene and polypropylene are the two main types of plastic to look out for. To be on the safe side, also check the product is free from polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and nylon and you’re good to go.” Still wondering? Check out the  “Good Scrub Guide” or put the “Beat the Microbead” app on your smartphone. Choose well, we only have one ocean and one you!

Download the “Good Scrub Guide” and find the “Beat the Microbead” app  here.

 

Mother’s Day (or any day) Picnic Perfect! Plastic Free

By | In the News, Sustainable Living, Uncategorized, W2O Blog | No Comments

Thinking of a picnic outing on Mother’s Day?  Make your picnic perfect and plastic free! Plastic is forever! And because it breaks down over time into small pieces, most of it ends up in our waterways and finally our oceans, where it is mistaken for food by the fish that we in turn eat.

A Perfect Picnic along the Charles River, Boston

A Perfect Picnic along the Charles River, Boston

Below are some fabulous links to W2O’s favorite plastic free websites to inspire you to nix the plastic and bring reusables when planning your day at the beach or picnic in your community.  Newly marketed “bioplastics” are not the answer here. Products that are promised to be green aren’t neccesarily compostable unless they are disposed of properly. Lesley McClurg for Capital Public Radio (full article here) explains, “You might buy the tableware believing it’s better for the environment. But, that depends on where you toss it out.” So beware! Products marked “compostable” might not be the best choice.

Consider using stainless steel cutlery and glass containers for your day out. Packing with a bit of thought adds flair, sophistication and makes a ho hum event special. Think about using a wicker basket and lovely blanket with glasses and plates or simply use an old bedspread, reusable bag and any covered containers that you can easily pack and then bring home. Nix the plastics and show off some innovative creativity and style. Start a conversation with your guests about why you made the choice to make your picnic perfect and plastic free!

Photo: foodimentary.com

Photo: foodimentary.com

 

Eco Lunchbox has a great selection of beautiful lunch boxes and bags complete with utensils and cloth napkins.

ecolunchbox-picnic-abes

Snazzy ideas from Eco Lunchbox

Life without Plastic has a variety of economical cool plastic free options. Check out their sale items.

Life Without Plastic! the good life!

Life Without Plastic! the good life!

 

 

 

 

 

 

This hamper, although a bit pricey, is a classic from Crate and Barrel and will last you a lifetime.  Careful that you don’t get sucked into the melamine and acrylic gear marketed alongside the basket. Instead opt for the cool class bottle! Cheers! peterboro-handmade-picnic-basket

And finally, check out the following links to learn more about plastic pollution and the easy steps you can do to start living a plastic free life:

Surfrider Foundation: Rise Above Plastics
Center for Biological Diversity: Ocean Plastic 

Water Rising: Our Planet; Your Actions

By | Events, Featured Post, In the News, Sustainable Living, Uncategorized, W2O Blog | No Comments
Photo: George Steinmetz

Photo: George Steinmetz

W2O’s event Water Rising: The Impact on Humanity, was a huge success. The Imax was nearly full; our luncheon sold out. Union of Concerned Scientist Senior Analyst Erika Spanger-Siegfried’s explanation of the science of warming oceans inspired conversations about the affects of sea level rise across the globe. The juxtaposition of what actions rich and poor nations are taking to mitigate and prepare for rising seas was clearly shown in George Steinmetz’s moving photography. But success for W2O is measured by what happens after you leave our events. Are you taking the message home to your family and communities? Educating to inspire action is our mission!

Please take a look at the action card, given to each attendee at our event, and consider how you can help reduce emission that have ramifications close to home and as far away as Kiribati, the island nation and home to our event guest Ambassador Baaro.

Han_W20_Apr9_-10

photo credit: Li Han

Founder and Chair of W2O, Barbara Burgess says, “Now is the time to take action to protect our blue planet.” Join W2O, “like us” on Facebook to make sure that you are up to date on all of our events, and tell a friend about what you are doing today to take action on this important issue. Thank you for joining with us to make our blue planet sustainable!