The Earth’s Air Conditioner and our Planetary Emergency

By | Action today, Featured Post, In the News, Uncategorized, W2O Blog | No Comments

The New York Times today gives us information from every prominent scientific organization on climate that now is the time to pay attention to the signs of warming in our oceans.  This article, primarily about the decline of the ice in the Arctic, talks about the significance of the ice melt as a catalyst for trapping the sun’s heat as the white of the ice is replaced with the dark ocean, in turn, melting more ice.  Research scientist at The Snow and Ice Center, Walt Meier, says that “the Arctic is the earth’s air-conditioner” and that “it’s not just the polar bears might go extinct, or that the native communities might have to adapt, which we’re already seeing-there are larger climate effects.”  Dr. James E. Hansen, a prominent NASA climate scientist, warns that “the scientific community realizes that we have a planetary emergency.”  Time for all of us to take emergency action by reducing “human release of greenhouse gases” and take responsibility for the part we all play in this scenario.

This Weekend! Don’t Miss Out! Wrecking Ball event to celebrate the renovations of the Great Ocean Tank at NEAq

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Mark your calendars for the most exciting evening September 15th at the New England Aquarium. Cocktails around the Great Ocean Tank, dinner with food by renown chef Ming Tsai and dancing at the most beautiful of Boston’s water front venues, the Harbor View Terrace Pavilion.  Be part of the celebration as the New England Aquarium begins its transformation of the Great Ocean Tank.

For More Info click here

Grant money awarded to the New England Aquarium and others for Climate Change Education

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The New England Aquarium and other “informal science venues” such as zoos and other aquariums will be ready to educate visitors about the very complex topic of climate change thanks, in part, to a grant of 5.5 million dollars from the National Science Foundation. The grant will help The New England Aquarium, a leader in climate change research, communicate the science of climate change and its impact on marine ecosystems. http://news.neaq.org/2012/08/55-million-grant-for-climate-change.html

Read about how we are effected by climate change here in New England, (including information on the coastal waters here in M.A.)

Summer Sea Turtle Lecture at the New England Aquarium August 21st

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Heather Tausig, Associate Vice President of Conservation at the New England Aquarium, shared this special announcement with W2O and we are happy to pass it on to you!

The New England Aquarium’s Marine Conservation Action Fund will be hosting a special guest speaker at the Aquarium on August 21st. Mr. Didiher Chacon Chaverri, Director of the Latin American Programs for the Wider Caribbean Sea Turtle Conservation Network (WIDECAST), will discuss the sea turtle protection programs WIDECAST has spearheaded on the Pacific and Caribbean coasts of Costa Rica, efforts that were supported by MCAF grants in 2011 and 2012. Mr. Chaverri will speak about the diverse methods WIDECAST uses to improve the plight of sea turtles, including, nightly patrols to protect sea turtle nests from poachers, rescue and rehabilitation of injured turtles, and outreach and education programs for local communities. He will also speak about volunteer opportunities available through WIDECAST to do hands-on sea turtle conservation work in Costa Rica.

The New England Aquarium is honored to host Mr. Chaverri and to share an inspiring example of the important conservation impact being made by MCAF grantees all over the world. We hope you will be able to join us for his talk at 7pm on August 21st at the Aquarium’s Harborside Learning Lab. The web-link to RSVP for this event can be found on the Aquarium’s “Lecture Series” page: http://www.neaq.org/education_and_activities/programs_and_classes/aquarium_lecture_series/index.php.

Sylvia Earle inspires W2O

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Sylvia Earle with J. Woody Hastings at Living Lights

 

 

On July 31st, W2O co sponsored an event at Harvard called Living Light that featured Sylvia Earle, Explorer in Residence at National Geographic, along with Professor of Natural Science and bioluminescence expert, J. Woody Hastings and featuring a dance performance by Kirstin McArdle Dance company.

Ms. Earle spoke eloquently about her mission to increase awareness about the plight of our ocean and told a wonderful story about reminding the folks at Google Earth to include the Oceans in their website. She described committing the faux pas of calling the site “Google Dirt” http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2009/02/090202-google-oceans-missions.html and as a result of her comments, she was enlisted to help with the creation of Google Ocean. Knowledge and passion speaks volumes when recruiting ocean stewards. Her passion and wisdom inspires us to continue to fight for healthy oceans.

W2O to co-sponsor Bioluminescence and Conservation event July 31st

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This event, co-sponsored by W2O along with our friends at Pleiades and Harvard University will highlight the beauty and importance of bioluminescence and conservation. Dr. Sylvia Earle, explorer in residence, National Geographic and Mission Blue Foundation for the protection of marine areas around the globe, will join scientists, artist and dancers for an evening of education and wonder. Join us on July 31st at 6pm. Seating is limited, so hurry!

Plastic Ocean Pollution

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With Dianna Cohen scheduled as the featured speaker for our spring event on April 10th, I’ve been doing some background reading on plastic pollution.  While this article isn’t new, it is a good summary of some of the issues.  Stayed tuned for photographs coming later this week!

Plastic Breaks Down in Ocean, After All — And FastThough ocean-borne plastic trash has a reputation as an indestructible, immortal environmental villain, scientists announced yesterday that some plastics actually decompose rapidly in the ocean. And, the researchers say, that’s not a good thing. The team’s new study is the first to show that degrading plastics are leaching potentially toxic chemicals such as bisphenol A into the seas, possibly threatening ocean animals, and us.

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