Open Ocean Trading Company's Focus Fish Initiative

Open Ocean Trading Company’s Focus Fish Initiative

W2O wants to support the replenishing of our New England endangered fish population and wants, at the same time, to support our local fishing communities.  Sometimes we feel like the two ideas don’t always easily go hand in hand, especially with the recent quota cuts for fisherman in the Northeast. Some quotas will force fisherman into selling their boats and permits because they just can’t make a decent living with the current restrictions.  Hearing about a new initiative by Open Ocean Trading gives hope that the future of the small boat fisherman will be brighter.  This new Northeast company, Open Ocean Trading (OOT), is working hard to help small boat fisheries keep fishing.

Friend of W2O, Nancy Barrett, Open Ocean Trading’s Director of Business Development describes the Initiative for “Focus Fish:”

Now is the most critical time to keep these small boat fishermen in business. We must work together to preserve the proud and well-known fishing culture that has been woven into Boston and New England history.

Open Ocean Trading believes the solution lies in the supply chain. Everything starts with the fishermen.  They are the foundation of this fragile industry and if they go, the entire system (processors, wholesalers, dealers) will be pulled down with them.  The fish you and I eat will no longer come from our shores but will be imported from overseas via large vessels where fishery management is sometimes absent. If this happens, our seafood might be less traceable, questions will linger about whether it is responsibly harvested, and it might not be a healthy choice for the consumer. We all like to know where our fish is coming from and local seems like the best choice.

Right now, OOT is helping local fishermen survive by creating a new market for previously marginalized species inside the dining halls of universities and colleges in the Northeast.  These fish, now proudly called “Focus Fish,” are the species we need to focus on now-they are the most sustainable choices both for the environment and for our New England local fishing industry.

The beauty of Focus Fish is that it is varies regionally and seasonally. What is responsible to fish for, here, in New England, is different than what people should concentrate their purchasing power on in the mid-Atlantic or on the west coast.  For example, dogfish on the west coast is considered a “red light” species, but here in New England the stocks are rebuilt, and according to recent data, have become an additional stressor to the Atlantic Cod stocks because their bellies are full of juvenile Cod fish!

By creating a market for Focus Fish in colleges and universities, everyone wins – fishermen survive quota cuts and continue fishing, the supply chain avoids collapse, and college students are introduced to new delicious, nutritious, and local species.

OOT recently held a taste test of four New England Focus Fish; Redfish, Dogfish, Pollock, and Hake, at a local campus dining hall. The students surveyed showed that:

  • 88% of the students said they care about where their fish was caught and who caught it
  • 91% felt that having a role in sustaining local community fisheries was somewhat to very important
  • 94% thought the fish they tried was as just as good, better, or much better than fish they were familiar with eating

Wellesley College, located in Massachusetts, was the first school to team up with OOT to bring Focus Fish to their campus. They believed OOT’s forward thinking approach to the fishing industry reflected their own value of innovation and sustainability.

If you are alumni of a school that shares values about sustainability or have a connection to a school that you care about, recommend that they source Focus Fish through Open Ocean Trading and help sustain the fishermen in your area. Schools can use the supply chain that they already have in place, but now they will know exactly where the fish is coming from.  Using OTT makes a real, measurable impact on the industry while supporting local, traceable, nutritious, and delicious seafood.

For more info on Open Ocean Trading: www.openoceantrading.com  and a great video of how a local fisherman uses Open Ocean Trading to maintain a healthy, profitable product: http://www.openoceantrading.com/videos.html