W2O Blog

Posted on 10/23//16

img_8543Kombu kelp lasagna anyone? When thinking of cooking with fresh greens, seaweed is hardly the first thing to come to mind for most people. Dr. Nichole Price and Chef Barton Seaver joined W2O members last week to show us why we shouldn’t be so quick to rule out vegetarian options from the sea when planning our menus.

At our “Cooking with Sea Greens” event, both presenters extolled the virtues of cultivating and consuming seaweeds. Dr. Nichole Price, a marine ecologist who studies climate change at Bigelow Laboratories in Maine, explained how these marine plants can play an important role in fighting climate change. Large seaweeds, such as kelp, are functionally the “trees’” of the ocean, absorbing carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas, while producing life-sustaining oxygen. These amazing plants can lower acidity levels and also absorb toxins from the water column, helping to maintain healthy chemistry. While these absorptive abilities make a big difference for local ecosystems, toxins aren’t transferred to people when consumed, making these plants a powerhouse before and after harvest. Dr. Price’s work communicates this science, engaging local communities and inspiring active solutions. Seaweed aquaculture meets both these goals: healthy oceans, healthy communities.

Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Science

Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

Shifting how and where we grow our food could also translate into healthier diets. Sea greens are jam-packed with nutrients, providing often-lacking iodine, among others. “This is a blue revolution and my job is to convince you to eat it,” explains Barton Seaver. Seaver had no trouble convincing us; everything he cooked was delicious. From seasoning soups with seaweed for a “sultry sauna of flavor” to zesty pesto and fresh salads, attendees tasted a variety of dishes that would make you forget everything you think you know about seaweed. Barton Seaver’s cookbooks show you how to bring sustainable, delectable treats into your own kitchen. Sea greens are truly a super food: good for you, good for our oceans.

Chef Barton Seaver with W2O member Meghan Jeans

Chef Barton Seaver with W2O member Meghan Jeans

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Todays Blog contributor Emily Conklin, is a Master’s candidate in Marine Biology at Northeastern University. She is currently an intern for W2O working on outreach and education and plans to continue her career in science education after graduation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted on 09/22//16

What a relief to finally hear some promising, hopeful and, quite frankly, exciting news about protection for our oceans. September’s headlines about President Obama designating Papahānaumokuākea off of Hawaii and the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts in the Atlantic as National Monuments could not have come at a better time. Every day there is a broadcast, article, or radio commentary about climate change and the devastation taking its toll on our blue planet. Ten years ago information regarding ocean risk was something you searched for in an environmental magazine or maybe the science section of a newspaper. It is telling that the coverage of climate science related to our oceans is now every publication’s front page news.  This hopeful sign signals that conservation groups are no longer “preaching to the choir” and that generations are learning and becoming keenly aware of the importance of protecting our oceans for our future. With his announcement at the Our Ocean Conference, President Obama declared that “The health of our planet’s oceans determine, in large part, the health of our bodies and the health of our economies.”  Thank you President Obama, for putting the health of our oceans on the world stage and for giving us hope that this might be the first wave of more protection of vulnerable marine areas.wapo-ocean-legacy-ad

Posted on 08/28//16

Photo of Blue Trevally: US Fish and Wildlife Service

Photo of Blue Trevally: US Fish and Wildlife Service

Mahalo” (thank you in Hawaiian) to President Obama and many others for Monument designation expansion of the pristine area of Papahānaumokuākea off the coast of Hawaii. It is now the largest protected area (land or sea) in the world! This is big world news this week and hopefully sends a message to everyone of the importance of protecting vital habitat everywhere in our oceans. Protected areas are the basis of climate refuge and, according to Douglas McCauley from UC Santa Barbara in this NPR interview, the area of Papahānaumokuākea is one of the most spectacular places on earth. “You put on a mask, and the mask essentially becomes a time machine. You put your head under water, and you’re looking at what the ocean looked like on reefs thousands of years ago. It’s what Hawaii-the reefs that we see when we go on vacation out there-looked like before we impacted and disturbed this ecosystem,” says McCauley.

Photo: Lee Gillenwater The Pew Charitable Trust

Photo: Lee Gillenwater
The Pew Charitable Trust

Marine protected areas have proved to be a hotspot for the study of climate change and have demonstrated that when left alone, without fishing, tourism or reef disturbance, protected areas are able to rebound from damaging human activity. W2O co-founder and Chair of Trustees of the New England Aquarium Donna Hazard is so grateful for the news from Hawaii but also knows that she wants to see more areas protected.  She is particularly concerned about the Atlantic where it might be more difficult to imagine the abundance of diversity under the dark blue cold waters. “It’s so important to protect those biologically diverse habitats.  It would be great if I could just know that during my lifetime I could help secure more marine protected areas for the next generation. We can’t afford to let this opportunity pass by without trying to protect the most worthy scientifically significant marine areas,” Hazard passionately remarked when speaking about the possibility of a monument in the Atlantic.  “I am hopeful that the wonderful press and excitement about the Monument expansion of Papahānaumokuākea will help propel the movement for more marine protected areas,” Hazard added.

 

Posted on 06/23//16

 

Suntan lotion is at the top of the list for your summer holiday. Choose one that is healthy for you and for our oceans.

Consider this the next time you are investing in skincare protection for you and your family: most suntan lotions are harmful to marine life. Researchers at NOAA and the National Park Service warn us that, “the products covering our skin wash off when we enter the water, and it adds up! Research tells us that 6,000-14,000 tons of sunscreen lotion are emitted into coral reef areas each year. This means that our most popular reefs, such as those in our national parks, are exposed to the majority of sunscreens.” Scientists tell us that no sunscreens are completely “reef safe” and in fact, according to a study by the Coral Disease and Health Consortium (CDHC) and Cheryl M. Woodley, PhD, over 3,500 sunscreen products worldwide contain Oxybenzone (also known as BP-3;Benzophenone-3) which is known to have toxic effects on marine life. 

Look for a mineral-based sunscreen to protect you and the reef

Look for a mineral-based sunscreen to protect you and the reef

Tropical Snorkeling.com has a guide to better choice mineral-based sunscreens that might be right for you and your family. Proprietors of the site, Galen and Nicole give the low down on which are water resistant, which are oily and which ones go on clear (Yes!). Remember: when you can, use clothing (rash guard, hat, wetsuit) to cover up!
Good for you. Good for our oceans.

More on the science and research for this topic:

CDHC Scientific Study by Cheryl Woodley

http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/news/nov15/sunscreen-corals.html

oceanservice.noaa.gov/…ws/feb14/sunscreen

 

Posted on 06/08//16

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Emily at WOD

Happy World Ocean Day from Women Working for Oceans (W2O)  

I am thrilled to be working with W2O on outreach and advocacy this summer and New England Aquarium’s World Oceans Day was the perfect first assignment. The event drew hundreds of families, all interested in learning more about our precious ocean resources and what they can do to preserve them.

W2O’s booth and education activity focused on the importance of Cashes Ledge, 80 miles off of the New England coast, and our work with partner organizations to try and have it established as a National Monument. Children colored in pictures of ecologically important marine organisms as part of a letter writing campaign to urge President Obama to designate protection for Cashes Ledge. Even the littlest participants had touching and remarkable things to say about the ocean and were eager to talk about the animals they were designing. It was exciting and refreshing to see such passion for the environment and enthusiasm for ensuring these ocean treasures are healthy and available for years to come.

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Interacting with the next generation of ocean conservationists, I was inspired by the level of interest in action demonstrated by World Oceans Day and am excited to move forward with this and other W2O projects. I can’t wait to see what the rest of the year will bring! 

Emily Conklin holds a BA in Biology from Wheaton College and is a Masters of Science Candidate in Marine Biology at Northeastern.

For more information on how you can help Save Atlantic Treasures, HERE

 

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Posted on 04/21//16

Guest blogger Nigella Hillgarth is President and CEO of the New England Aquarium and a W2O board member

Several hundred years ago there was said to be a strange and fierce sea creature that attacked ships.  The Water-Owl or Ziphius had the body of a fish and a head of an owl with huge eyes and a beak-like a sword. Today we think the animal behind these stories is Cuvier’s beaked whale or Goose-beaked whale. This deep water whale is the most widely distributed beaked whale species.

In early February I was on a sailing ship in the Caribbean passing through the channel between St Lucia and Martinique.  It is deep in that area –  several thousand feet and suitable for beaked whales. I was not thinking about whales at the time because I was busy photographing the brown boobies that were following the ship. Suddenly a robust, chocolate brown animal appeared next to the ship below me. I took as many photographs as I could before it disappeared into the deep. I was pretty certain I had seen a beaked whale but I had no idea what species.  It was not large – about 10 to 12 feet long but had the typical curved dorsal fin towards the back of the body and a strange elongated and slightly bulbous head. When I returned one of our marine mammal scientists at the New England Aquarium identified it as a young Cuvier’s beaked whale. I feel so lucky to have seen one of these elusive animals.

Cuvier’s beaked whales can dive deeper than any other marine mammal. A recent study shows that at least one individual went down as far as 9,816 feet!  Not much is known about these elusive and extreme divers, but there is concern that noise in the ocean from sonar and seismic testing may cause these whales to strand.  There is evidence to suggest that some of these stranded animals have surfaced too quickly and developed damage similar to that of the bends in humans.

Noise in the ocean is a serious threat to marine mammals and other marine life.  Commercial shipping noise, sonar testing and seismic surveys can clearly have significant, long-lasting, and widespread impacts on marine mammal and fish populations. Normally, when we think about pollution in the seas we don’t think about noise. We think about plastics and chemicals and ghost fishing nets.  Noise in its various forms is just as big a problem for life in the ocean.  If we care about the future of strange and elusive mammals such as the ‘Water-owl’ we need to understand and mitigate noise impacts in the ocean far more than at present.

Photo: Nigella Hillgarth

Learn more about seismic testing and how you can help stop ocean noise HERE

 

Posted on 04/06//16

Stop Ocean Noise That Threatens Marine Life

We think of our oceans as a silent underwater world. In reality, the ocean is full of noise. Diving on any given day, anywhere in the world, you might hear fish chomping, waves crashing, mammals calling to each other and even rain falling. Sink a hydrophone in the ocean and discover a marine jungle of animal noises from the tiniest shrimp to the largest blue whale. Marine life depends on this soundscape for mating, finding food, navigation and avoiding predation.

Keith Ellenbogen's school of Bigeye Trevally

Keith Ellenbogen’s school of Bigeye Trevally

This ocean cacophony was all natural until the advent of the industrial revolution when human-made sounds from blasting, drilling, military, and shipping began drowning out these important biological cues.  To search for oil and gas, arrays of airguns are towed behind ships and release intense blasts of compressed air into the water–think about a dynamite explosion underwater every 10 seconds for days and sometimes months on end. Airgun noise can displace and confuse whales, dolphins and porpoises by interfering with their ability to communicate.

Recently, the Obama administration moved to prohibit lease sales for testing in the Mid and South Atlantic for 2017-22. That decision does not halt seismic permitting in the Atlantic. The federal government will likely propose opening up Atlantic waters for oil and gas exploration with airgun surveys, affecting many marine mammal species, including the endangered North Atlantic right whale. According to the Department of Interior’s own estimates, the proposed seismic airgun array blasting in the Atlantic could harm up to 138,00 whales and disrupt their behavior over 13 million times. Take action to stop ocean noise. Tell your elected officials that you do not want them to support seismic testing.

Use this template to email or mail your Senator to stop ocean noise.  Use this link, Find your Senator or Congresswoman/Congressman for the address.

If you live in Massachusetts:
Letter to MA Senator Markey

Letter to MA Senator Warren

Your voice matters!

Posted on 02/05//16

FullSizeRenderA very nice man, Dr. Stan Szyfelbein (pronounced Shi-fell-bine) told me today that when he shops here and in his native Poland, he uses all different sorts of reusable bags. His favorite is what he calls a “siatka.” Siatka is Polish for “anything that has the appearance of a net.” Stan, a wise man of 81, and retired Chief of Anesthesia at Shriners Hospital here in Boston says “Bags need to be functional and fashionable. Every man and woman use to carry a siatka rolled up in their pocket when they went shopping.”

The cotton siatka (or today’s string bag) is durable, washes easily and can be very beautiful too. Here are some wonderful examples of siatkas to add to your repertoire of reusable bags. Nix the plastics! Good for you, good for our oceans.

Pinterest has bags to own and to make!

Pinterest has bags to own and to make!

Ecohip cotton string bag on amazon.com

Ecohip cotton string bag on amazon.com

 

 

 

www.estringbags.com.au

www.estringbags.com.au

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Posted on 01/02//16

Lilly Davidson from Libby

Photo: Libby Davidson

With all our worrying world issues, it’s hard to keep climate on our minds. New Years’ resolutions often include topics of health, happiness, wealth, safety and security. Of course, all of these are directly tied to the success of our planet and climate. A healthy planet gives us joy, feeds us, and provides us with our precious natural resources, which dictates economic stability.

Should we be more hopeful about the future of our climate in 2016? Books will be written about whether or not the Paris21 Climate talks will lead to real action for curbing human emissions that contribute to climate change. Arguments will ensue about whether or not we are doing enough, quickly enough, to make an impact. Some will move on in hopes that others will continue the discussion and come up with the answers. But 2016 will be an important climate year and W2O will be encouraging you to stay hopeful and act.

Hashtags are not enough. Sometimes you have to write a letter or make a call to get someone’s attention.  W2O often asks its members and event attendees to write or call their elected government officials to encourage the passing of legislation that protects our oceans. Does it make a difference? According to legislative aids at the Massachusetts State House: Yes! Letters and calls keep topics on the minds of legislators encouraging research that contributes to the process of pushing a bill through to success.

More tips for your action on climate in 2016:

We are often asked, “What can I do?” Here are some tips from the New England Aquarium and the New York Times on how you can help curb carbon emissions:

  • Eat vegetables and cut down on intake of meat and dairy. The production of meat and dairy is carbon intensive.
  • Take the bus, ride a bike or walk.  If you drive to work alone, your commuting eats up more than your entire carbon budget for the year. 
  • Shop wisely, avoid waste.  Wasted food adds to the total amount of the food that is produced.  A large portion of wasted food ends up in landfills and, as it decomposes, adds methane to the atmosphere.
  • Fly less, drive less. Take the train or bus. If you do fly, avoid first class.  On average, a first class seat is two and a half times more detrimental to the environment than coach because it takes up more room resulting in more flights.
  • Reduce your mileage input by driving the speed limit. Tune your engine, keep tires inflated and avoid buying that third car.
  • Buy less stuff; waste less stuff.  Each thing that you recycle is one fewer thing that has to be produced.
  • Advocate public policies that develop clean energy and efficient transportation.  Vote with the oceans in mind.

Good for you. Good for our oceans.

 

Posted on 12/11//15

Barb uses paper bags and gifts of her garden to wrap her holiday presents!

Barb reuses paper bags and gifts of her garden to wrap her holiday presents!

A Holiday message from W2O Chair Barbara Burgess

“I have such deep respect and appreciation for our world’s oceans.  It brings my family and me joy and peace.  And when I think about the millions and millions of mouths that the oceans feed I am filled with gratitude.  As a mother, it feels natural to protect what I love.  So when I think about the holiday season and gift giving it simply feels right to give a gift that says,”Together we will save our great blue planet!”  All of us at W2O would like to share these fun gift ideas with you and hope they may spark action and conversation this Holiday season.”

Yours in the spirit of a healthy planet,
Barbara

Your choices make a difference—whether it’s a fun outing, a gift for a child or ocean lover or, the recipes you cook at your home!

Get on board!
Upcycle plastic pollution in our oceans; the Bureo skateboard is made of recycled fishing nets gathered off the Chilean coastline.
http://neaq.ordercompletion.com/a556/minnow-complete-cruiser-skateboard.html

Surprise someone with an Animal Encounter!
Give a memorable experience and also provide vital support to the New England Aquarium’s conservation and research mission.
http://www.neaq.org/visit_planning/tours_and_programs/programs/index.php

Live life with less polluting plastic!
We all love our yogurt but hate using all those plastic containers. Make your own yogurt (easy!) save money and nix the plastic! http://www.amazon.com/Euro-Cuisine-YM80-Yogurt-

Eat sustainable fish!
This cookbook, by W2O friend author and chef, Barton Seaver, provides simple, delicious, sustainable recipes that are good for the planet.
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/for-cod-and-country-barton-seaver/1101074324

Learn about protecting sea turtles!
Each purchase of Liz Cunningham’s book, Ocean Country, creates a donation of 21% of the book’s royalties for the New England Aquarium’s Marine Conservation Action Fund. MCAF is a unique and effective micro-funding program that protects and promotes ocean animals and habitats.
http://lizcunningham.net/ocean_country_the_book/

Think big!
Give a North Atlantic right whale sponsorship. With fewer than 600 North Atlantic right whales alive today, New England Aquarium researchers are working tirelessly to study and protect this critically endangered species.
http://www.neaq.org/membership_and_giving/individual_donations/animal_sponsorship/right_whale_sponsorship.php

Build Awareness!
The beautiful Nurdle in the Rough jewelry was created with the goal of building awareness about plastic pollution. Each piece is carefully crafted from found plastic near artist Kathleen Crabill’s home in Hawaii. 10% of the proceeds is donated to ocean conservation efforts. http://www.nurdleintherough.com

 

From Nurdle in the Rough

From Nurdle in the Rough