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Posted on 08/02//13

Today I am setting you all up for some serious summer reading. Links to this New England Aquarium refresher on Climate Change is a good introduction to the more scientific facts in Science Magazine’s article “Natural Systems in Changing Climates,”  and its comprehensive list of articles that include a wide range of topics taking the mystery out of questions about the impact of human induced changes in our climate. Covered topics include the economic impact and human health vulnerability effected by our warming planet. Important summer reading from W2O.

photoWhat are you reading that might be of interest to our Ocean Loving members this summer?

Posted on 07/29//13

Blueberry Pie!

Blueberry Pie!

Scott Wilson of Wilson Farm responded to my query about plastic containers for blueberries with a thoughtful email describing the devotion that Wilson has to being a sustainable and earth friendly company. “Farmers in general are environmentalists by nature and by need.  We think of and treat our environment (our land and water) as one would think of and treat their child: as the most important thing in our lives.  Truth be told, we have been environmentalists since long before it was a cause. As an example, we have been composting our greens since our inception in 1884. It is with the environment in mind that we run our family farm.”

According to Scott, those plastic containers for blueberries are not the norm-they were used to differentiate two products and now that Wilson’s own blueberries are harvested, they are back to the pulp/paper green containers that we are use to seeing. I hope he can find a solution to that issue for next time and nixsay the plastic which as we all know is seldom recycled and not “biodegradable” but just breaks down into tiny fragments that then seep into soil and ocean. Watching..and not breaking up…yet.

Posted on 07/29//13

To W2O and many other Ocean Advocates, the appointment of Gina McCarthy as administrator of the EPA signals the possibility of change and action regarding our usage of carbon pollution.”Serious efforts” says the White House, with a real powerhouse of a woman (and fellow Massachusetts native) leading the charge for a cleaner planet. Can we have tentative hope that she will be able to implement a serious strategy for curbing emissions that are threatening our health and the health of our planet?

Gina McCarthy at her confirmation as Administrator of the EPA (Washington Post)

Gina McCarthy at her confirmation as Administrator of the EPA (Washington Post)

 

Posted on 07/25//13

Want to Try Something New? Buy Directly from your Fish Farmer.

There’s an up and coming effort in the United States to get a step closer to the farm. More so, there’s certainly an effort to buy what’s local and think sustainably. So, why not try something new and buy directly from your fish farmer? Remove all doubt in what you’re buying! (Oceana reported that at least 25% of all seafood is mislabeled! eeek!) If you buy from these farms you’ll come home with the most sustainably harvested and freshest fish while supporting an American made product. Even better, you won’t have to sacrifice taste!

 

The list below is intended for Boston residents, like myself, who are looking for the best and most sustainable seafood available nearby! Remember, while these farms have limited offerings, many of these fish are awesome substitutions for much less sustainable species.

Australis: Turner Falls, Massachusetts

The best source for barramundi! An awesome, closed system farm.

http://www.thebetterfish.com/sustainability/massachusetts-farm

E&T Farms: West Barnstable, Massachusetts

A great source on the Cape for tilapia! They also grow veggies and make honey on site! They’re an aquaponic system-meaning they’re a closed system farm and they grow more than just fish.

http://www.eandtfarmsinc.com/

Island Creek Oyster

Photo: .http://www.islandcreekoysters.com/

Island Creek Oyster Farms: Duxbury, Massachusetts

A great source for oysters and philanthropy! Island Creek Oysters have started their own foundation that helps to start aquaculture systems throughout the developing world. I just visited the farm on Tuesday and accidentally sat in on their team meeting. Oops.http://www.islandcreekoysters.com/

Sky8 Shrimp Farm: Stoughton, Massachusetts

A recirculating aquaculture system just 20 minutes outside of Boston. It’s a new business so their gourmet white shrimp are not widely available yet. However, this is a place to look out for!

http://www.sky8shrimpfarm.com/

While this list can certainly help you buy your seafood, are you unconvinced that these species are worth trying? Chef Barton Seaver wrote up an awesome guide to using species that you might normal not think of, simply because they might not be the most popular choice. http://ocean.nationalgeographic.com/ocean/take-action/seafood-substitutions/ 

More on Seafood Fraud: http://oceana.org/en/our-work/promote-responsible-fishing/seafood-fraud/overview

Want to double check a species of fish you’re buying? Seafood Watch is the go to site, they even have an app.

http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/seafoodwatch.aspx

 

Posted on 07/23//13

Taxis under waterA USA Today article by Tom King, CEO of National Grid and Jeff Sterba, CEO of American Water, highlights a new study from the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions that asks business to think about investing now to protect customers from high costs related to Climate related damage to infrastructure by becoming “extreme weather resilient.”  We all know that cost to companies ends up as cost to the customer.  Are companies and communities listening to Mother Nature?  “The report found that 55 of the Standard & Poor’s Global 100 companies have already experienced the effects of extreme weather or expect to within the next five years. Condemned factories, loss of power and water supplies, rising insurance and raw material costs, and disruption of supply and distribution chains, are just a few of the many brutal business realities.” Preparedness, updated systems and thoughtful choices today could save millions (or billions!) in the future.

Posted on 07/21//13

The Boston Globe article on use and overuse of air conditioning and its affect on the environment made me feel guilty of my own consumption in the last week and relieved that the forecast predicts less heat and humidity for the next few days. “According to Stan Cox, author of the 2010 book “Losing Our Cool,” air conditioning in the United States already has a global-warming impact equivalent to every US household driving an extra 10,000 miles per year.” I guess its time to reflect and use less (hard to do and sometimes unsafe when the weather has been a furnace for the last week..but maybe easier to do when there is moderate temps like today and I can just turn it down or off, even though I might have to convince my family that it is ok to feel warm.)

Beating the heat!

Beating the heat!

 

Posted on 07/17//13

Wilson's Farm (curtesy of big photo.com)

Wilson’s Farm (curtesy of big photo.com)

I am so lucky that I live within a short drive to many wonderful places to buy fresh fruits and vegetables. One of my favorite local haunts is Wilson’s Farm in Lexington, Ma.   It has been around for years and I love its fresh produce, lovely atmosphere and fabulous service.  I feel excitement when I find a parking spot under one of the trees closest to the cute walkway where I always seem to run into someone I know.

But wait.  Shopping in the last few months, I have noticed that like most stores, they have increased their packaging and use of plastics. I use to bring my bags, wander around and pull loose veggies and fruits from the stands and proceed to checkout…arrive home and use my handy dandy “storing fruits and vegetable guide from ecology center.org, which gives tips on how to store fruits and veggies with no plastic.  I was sad to see the blueberries in a plastic container today. “OUR OWN” is written on the label, which is prominently displayed and makes me excited to buy-but then in a plastic container? Rows and rows of beautiful fruit in plastic… I guess I need to find someone to ask about this and the recent changes…I will take the time to find out. I love this place…It is such a shame and I would hate to have to avoid yummy foods that I normally would buy (expensive too-but I feel worth it) or worse, find another place to shop…I don’t want to break up with Wilson’s Farms!

Posted on 07/14//13

IMG_0823 2W2O seeing another reminder today about why it is important to refuse plastic (yes, support that Massachusetts Plastic Bag Reduction Bill) and polluting waste when ever you have the option to do so. Todays Boston Globe the article “Are Big Blue Bins Bad for Recycling” talks about the limited success of single stream trash collection and outlines the list of “non recyclables.”

“At the plant, six people using hands and hooks pull non-recyclables off the line before the machines take over. Broken umbrellas, Styrofoam containers, wire hangers, plastic bags: all trash.”

Think about what you can do! It could be a simple “no” to a plastic straw, a plastic bag or a styrofoam cup.  It is easier than it seems. We can all play a part in keeping ourselves healthy and the ocean free of single use waste. Summer months mean cold drinks. We all love a frozen drink, iced coffee or tea.  I have been carrying my cup in the car (it tastes great in anything but plastic!) or if I am out and about without, I have asked the vendor to just put my drink in a paper cup. I get some funny looks and comments like “this cup won’t support that” and “it won’t be kept cold” Bullhicky. Icy and cold. I also did a little test the other day..the fear I had was that the cold drink would seep through the paper and ruin my oh so righteous moment of success.  Well, yes, it does seep through, but only after about an hour. If you are like me, you are consuming that cool lovely drink the moment you receive it! So, enjoy…but refuse the plastic.

Posted on 07/11//13

W2O loves our partners and friends at The New England Aquarium because it supports and funds research that protects what we love. Come to Aquarium for a free evening event July 17th at the Imax Theater Aquarium and learn about how the New England Aquariums’s Marine Conservation Action Fund helped Daniel Fernando on his quest to protect the majestic Manta Ray.

Underwater Flight: Protecting the Manta Rays of Sri Lanka

Daniel Fernando, project leader, Manta Trust – Sri Lanka
With widths reaching more than 20 feet from wingtip to wingtip, and weighing in at up to 2 tons, the graceful and mysterious manta is the largest of the ray species. Sadly, manta rays and their relatives, the mobula rays, are threatened by overfishing due to a growing demand for their gills for use in traditional Chinese medicine. Daniel Fernando, a scientist with the Manta Trust, has been documenting the grave impact of this fishery in Sri Lanka and India, which are among the world’s major exporters of dried manta and mobula gills. Fernando’s study, which was supported in part by the Aquarium’s Marine Conservation Action Fund, contributed to a major victory for manta and mobula rays in March, 2013, when the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) voted to strengthen trade regulations for these species. Fernando will speak about his research and the race to ensure the survival of these magnificent and highly vulnerable species. Register here.

Posted on 07/10//13

W2O intern Phoebe Racine is a member of the Class of 2014 at Dartmouth College. She studies Environmental Studies and Anthropology. This summer she is conducting a research project on Recirculating Aquaculture Systems, and is interning at the Healthy and Sustainable Food Program at the Harvard Center for Health and the Global Environment, and Women Working for Oceans.

Phoebe Racine


I’m Phoebe Racine, a rising senior at Dartmouth College and I’ve chosen to spend my summer doing research and then some more research. With two Dartmouth advisors, the lovely Anne Kapuscinski and Kim Locke, I have been reading deeply into the literature of food energy, but more specifically the energy that goes into and out of fish farming-aquaculture. At the Center for Healthy and Sustainable Food at Harvard, I’ve been working for Barton Seaver, where I’ve also been researching food energy and additionally nutrition. Finally, with Women Working for Oceans I’ve been able to see more of the action! I’ve attended state meetings in support of the State Bill to ban plastic grocery bags and have begun to write articles for blogs. Kapuscinski and Locke work extensively on Integrated Food Energy Systems, Seaver is a renowned seafood chef turned restorative seafood extraordinaire and W2O is a Boston-based nonprofit that works towards bettering our ocean through education and advocacy. You could say I’m lucky to have such (cough cough intimidating) cool bosses!

        But here is something I’ve learned through many hours of internet searches, countless articles and papers read, and multiple phone calls and meetings-putting fish on the table is confusing! What’s healthy? What’s sustainable? If I want to eat fish, which fish should I choose? These are just few of the questions I still think about and fuss over. However, today I have more answers than I had yesterday and I want to share with you some of my takeaways. Hopefully, you’ll find these both interesting and surprising!

1. 36% of all fish caught end up feeding pigs, chicken and farmed fish.

  • What this means: Livestock need certain levels of protein in their diet and for a long time these “trash fish” have been the cheapest way to get that protein.

  • What you can do: avoid eating carnivorous or omnivorous farmed species like shrimp, and in the case of land animals, do your best to eat grass fed or cage free.

2. More than “75% of global fisheries are traded while only 7% of meat, 17% of wheat, and 5% of rice is traded.” (Costa-Pierce et.al. 2011)

  • What this means: The fish you’re eating likely has hefty food miles attached to it! Ouch. However, there is hope, see number 4.

3. “At present, approximately 40% of all consumed fish and shellfish are farmed, and a 70% increase in aquaculture production by the year 2030 is predicted (FAO 2004).”

  • What this means: Aquaculture is fast growing field, which, overall is a wonderful thing! However, many of our farmed seafood products come from developing countries with looser regulations. Farmed seafood in developing countries have a whole host of pros and cons that deserve a book rather than a blurb on a blog post.

  • What you can do: Look at where your farmed fish is coming from. If it doesn’t give you a real location, than I say don’t buy it.

4. The LARGEST Recirculating Aquaculture farm is located in the U.S.! It’s called Blue Ridge Aquaculture and is located in Virginia.

  • What this means: Recirculating aquaculture is a type of fish farming that recycles more than 95% of its water. It therefore significantly limits pollution into the surrounding environment, recaptures nutrients, and halts the spread of disease and invasive species.

  • What you can do: There is an awesome, healthy, relatively sustainable source of fish that could be only minutes away from you! Buy American farmed fish if you can, you’d be supporting a growing field that’s rapidly improving its science.

5. Did I just say healthy? Why yes. “Fish are the most valuable foods for human nutrition, disease prevention, and brain development of any foods since they have the highest nutrient density (highest protein and oil contents in their flesh) of all food animals (Smil, 2002). ”

  • What this means: Fish are awesome sources of protein and nutrients!

  • What you can do: Don’t be afraid to eat fish. It’s widely agreed upon the the health benefits of eating fish at any stage in your life far outweigh the costs.

6. But isn’t seafood expensive? Not always! Canned seafood is actually a great and (often) cheaper alternative.

  • What you can do: When buying canned seafood make sure to go for a BPA free can with a brine or water base rather than oil. Since oil is not soluble in water omega-3s are maintained at the same levels as you would find in regular fillets.


Fish, let alone food, can be a confusing topic. I hope I’ve provided you either some clarity or some information (also some links below) that is easy to keep with you.

All my best, Phoebe Racine

Fish or Foe?

Fishing for fast, easy nutrition? Consider Canned!

Blue Ridge Aquaculture

W2O’s ocean friendly restaurant list