Sustainable Living

Posted on 11/11//12

I think I am a typical Sunday NYTimes reader. I scan the front page, flip to the Style Section (I grab it protectively from the pile in front of my husband-silly really-would he actually be interested in the Style Section!?) and then look for Maureen Dowd (especially interesting today, btw) or Nicolas Kristoff. But lately I am stealing the Sport Section. So unlike me- but I now know that if the Sunday Times has any noteworthy car articles, there is a secret (well, maybe just to me!!) “Automobile” section at the rear of the Sports page.  Every since W2O’s “Roadside Assistance: Driving Change on our Streets and In Our Oceans” event last month, I am very interested in how I can get my hands on a Ocean/Earth friendly automobile.  Today’s article (yes, that is at the end of the sports page on page 9-or here -) not only describes the new technology and features of the Prius, but it has a nifty chart (not on line) at the bottom that helps consumers decide which Prius might be right for them. Check it out…and then read Maureen Dowd.

Posted on 10/15//12

Yup, I think I might hate my car.

When I moved from Australia back to America with my three young children, I looked around my neighborhood for clues about what car I should purchase. The market here was new and different to me and I was overwhelmed with the amount of choices.  In the parking lot of our school there was a row of SUVs, as far as the eye could see, at drop off and pick up.  I bought one. Liked it. Loved being high up, loved being able to load the neighborhood kids into the car with all their gear and loved loading groceries in the back.   Now I think I might hate my car.  I hardly use the third row of seats, I cringe when I am filling the tank at the gas pump, and I wonder how my car emission is contributing to pollution and climate change as one of a gazillion of these cars in the burbs of MA.  I have started telling my teenagers that I can’t possibly drive them down to our town center and that they will have to walk…and they do!!

I need a new car. I need a car that I know will just contribute a tiny bit to curbing the huge catastrophe of climate change affecting our oceans and our planet.  But what to buy?  Can I afford one?  Hybrid? Diesel? Electric?  Hopefully I will have a better sense of all of these choices after the W2O event “Roadside Assistance: Driving Change on our Streets and in Our Oceans.”

Posted on 10/04//12

 


 

 

We hope you can join us on October 23rd for our Climate Change event, Roadside Assistance: Driving Change on our streets and in the oceans. There is so much to talk about and we are excited to have the expertise of Bud Ris, Pres. and CEO of the New England Aquarium to guide us through the basics of the concerns about climate change and its effects on our oceans and on us.  Before you come, visit the NEAq’s quick reference guide to the issues of climate and how it is already impacting New England.

 

Our panel, moderated by Emmy award winning journalist Lisa Hughes and featuring some of New England’s best known, car savvy professionals will inform, debate and educate about car emissions and what you can think about when making your next car purchase to insure that you have made the decision that will help protect our oceans and our health.

 

Join us! We look forward to seeing you on October 23rd!!

 

 

Posted on 09/13//12

Women Working for Oceans wants you to know about the importance of the Plastic Free Campus program from Plastic Pollution Coalition.

Women Working for Ocean’s (W2O) March talk “Plastics in the Ocean, Plastic in You”, powerfully presented by Dianna Cohen, artist and co-founder of Plastic Pollution Coalition (PPC), inspired an avalanche of ongoing behavior change here in M.A.  We learned so much from Dianna and PPC and we are thrilled with the initiatives in our communities and schools that have taken root because of their guidance.

PPC continues to make major strides in its work towards a world free of plastic pollution. PPC’s project, Plastic Free Campuses, has been short-listed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for a grant, and several other organizations have expressed their commitment to support the program.

Currently, PPC is raising funds for the kick off of the next phase of Plastic Free Campuses: 1500 campuses around the world working to reduce their plastic footprint. It is a great time to support their work. There are all levels of giving that make a huge impact on the success of this program.

Please use the links below and consider supporting the great work of this organization! They are making our oceans a healthier place for generations to come.

https://secure.acceptiva.com/?cst=c66093

http://plasticpollutioncoalition.org

 

Posted on 05/21//12

Seems like there are many opportunities to make the right choice regarding Single Use Plastic. REFUSE is the most important part of curbing the habit of choosing single use plastic in our every day lives. Keeping a place holder in our minds about the effect that plastic has on the oceans and on us is the most important step in making a difference. We can’t always make big life changes but we all can take small steps to reducing plastic waste. Choose the ceramic cup over the plastic cup! Every small step counts! Carry a reusable bag to the grocery store and support the Massachusetts Plastic Bag Reduction Bill by going to womenworkingforoceans.org and clicking on the “Take Action” tab for information on writing to your legislator. You can also scan down to the Blog on the Plastic Bag Reduction Bill below on this page. Small steps make a big difference.

Posted on 10/24//11


The Boston Globe hired the Biodiversity Institute of Ontario at the University of Guelph to test the DNA of fish to determine their species. Search results from individual stores and restaurants. Search your local stores and restaurants here.