In the News

Posted on 07/21//13

The Boston Globe article on use and overuse of air conditioning and its affect on the environment made me feel guilty of my own consumption in the last week and relieved that the forecast predicts less heat and humidity for the next few days. “According to Stan Cox, author of the 2010 book “Losing Our Cool,” air conditioning in the United States already has a global-warming impact equivalent to every US household driving an extra 10,000 miles per year.” I guess its time to reflect and use less (hard to do and sometimes unsafe when the weather has been a furnace for the last week..but maybe easier to do when there is moderate temps like today and I can just turn it down or off, even though I might have to convince my family that it is ok to feel warm.)

Beating the heat!

Beating the heat!

 

Posted on 07/14//13

IMG_0823 2W2O seeing another reminder today about why it is important to refuse plastic (yes, support that Massachusetts Plastic Bag Reduction Bill) and polluting waste when ever you have the option to do so. Todays Boston Globe the article “Are Big Blue Bins Bad for Recycling” talks about the limited success of single stream trash collection and outlines the list of “non recyclables.”

“At the plant, six people using hands and hooks pull non-recyclables off the line before the machines take over. Broken umbrellas, Styrofoam containers, wire hangers, plastic bags: all trash.”

Think about what you can do! It could be a simple “no” to a plastic straw, a plastic bag or a styrofoam cup.  It is easier than it seems. We can all play a part in keeping ourselves healthy and the ocean free of single use waste. Summer months mean cold drinks. We all love a frozen drink, iced coffee or tea.  I have been carrying my cup in the car (it tastes great in anything but plastic!) or if I am out and about without, I have asked the vendor to just put my drink in a paper cup. I get some funny looks and comments like “this cup won’t support that” and “it won’t be kept cold” Bullhicky. Icy and cold. I also did a little test the other day..the fear I had was that the cold drink would seep through the paper and ruin my oh so righteous moment of success.  Well, yes, it does seep through, but only after about an hour. If you are like me, you are consuming that cool lovely drink the moment you receive it! So, enjoy…but refuse the plastic.

Posted on 07/11//13

W2O loves our partners and friends at The New England Aquarium because it supports and funds research that protects what we love. Come to Aquarium for a free evening event July 17th at the Imax Theater Aquarium and learn about how the New England Aquariums’s Marine Conservation Action Fund helped Daniel Fernando on his quest to protect the majestic Manta Ray.

Underwater Flight: Protecting the Manta Rays of Sri Lanka

Daniel Fernando, project leader, Manta Trust – Sri Lanka
With widths reaching more than 20 feet from wingtip to wingtip, and weighing in at up to 2 tons, the graceful and mysterious manta is the largest of the ray species. Sadly, manta rays and their relatives, the mobula rays, are threatened by overfishing due to a growing demand for their gills for use in traditional Chinese medicine. Daniel Fernando, a scientist with the Manta Trust, has been documenting the grave impact of this fishery in Sri Lanka and India, which are among the world’s major exporters of dried manta and mobula gills. Fernando’s study, which was supported in part by the Aquarium’s Marine Conservation Action Fund, contributed to a major victory for manta and mobula rays in March, 2013, when the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) voted to strengthen trade regulations for these species. Fernando will speak about his research and the race to ensure the survival of these magnificent and highly vulnerable species. Register here.

Posted on 06/16//13

 

How does the Ocean make you feel?

How does the Ocean make you feel?

We asked attendees at the New England Aquarium’s World Ocean Day event a simple question; “How does the Ocean Make YOU Feel?  Our table attracted children of all ages and backgrounds.  The response was not surprising-but the depth of passion for writing and illustrating the answer was just inspiring.

 

Posted on 06/08//13

How does the Ocean make you feel?

How does the Ocean make you feel?

Join W2O us tomorrow 11-4, for a celebration of World Ocean Day on Central Wharf right near (and sponsored by) the New England Aquarium.  Family activities including a scavenger hunt, cooking demos, and live blue fun for the whole family. Tell us how the Ocean makes you feel.  More information HERE.

 

Posted on 06/05//13

BlueMind3 in Block Island, RI (photo: David Pu'u)

BlueMind3 in Block Island, RI (photo: David Pu’u)

Last week, W2O members visited Block Island, RI for the BlueMind 3 conference hosted by Ocean activist and scientist, Wallace J. Nichols. The conference included a variety of interesting ocean passionate folks including artists, educators, ocean advocates, and neuroscientists.  Yes, neuroscientists!  And they were the stars of the show, explaining to us that the ocean effects the brain in specific calming ways and reminding us that the message of hope for saving our oceans comes from communicating that beautiful feeling that comes over us when we are near or in its precious, powerful, magical presence.

Some memorable quotes from speakers at the conference:

“We speak of saving the ocean and the earth. In reality, it is the other way around. The ocean and earth save us!  Engaging hearts and hands accesses the mind. The extent of labor leads to the love and success of a project”  Ocean Matter’s Laura Parker Roerden

“I am in awe of the tenderness at this conference.”  Artist Ran Ortner

“The rythm of the ocean is ominous, heavy yet delicate and transparent.”  Artist Ran Ortner

“Beauty is the great connector. We don’t need to impact everyone, we only need to impact the right person and sometimes that is the person right in front of you” Photographer David Pu’u

“We need to remember the architecture of what we are doing.”  Photographer David Pu’u

“The word “sustainability” means only what we can sustain and the status quo.  We need to search for abundance and restore the resources because if we are the problem, we are also the solution.”  Conservationist and Chef, Bart Seaver

“We don’t (do conservation and awareness) to speak louder, we do it because it might make a difference.”    RI Poet Lisa Starr talking about conservation and caring for the ocean

“Choosing Block Island is giving us a bird’s perspective. On and island, we can come together and take in Island wisdom.”  Wallace J. Nichols introducing Block Island resident Lisa Starr

“Truly stating facts does not result in people making change.”  Dr. Helen Riess

“You won’t surf like me, you will surf like yourself.”  Van Curaza-Operation Surf and Van Curaza Surf School

“Why do we call this Planet Earth? It should be called Planet Ocean!”  Cartoonist Jim Toomey

 

 

Posted on 05/22//13

Plastic

Plastic

Apple would like us to think that its plastic white bag is a reusable bag. We might use it to take out the trash, but we certainly aren’t carrying it to the grocery store or using it as our “go to” environmentally friendly cool bag…It is Plastic. W2O believes that it is like any other single use bag-a pollutant that clogs our waterways, threatens marine animals and ultimately is a health risk to us.  Isn’t it time for Apple, an innovator on many levels, to make a great branding bag made out of a material other than plastic? Tell us what your think. Vote on our Facebook page.    Steve Jobs named Apple after his apple orchard and said in his commencement speech to Stanford University in 2005 that  “Whole Earth Catalog was the Bible of his generation.” I am sorry he is gone. I would have liked to have had this discussion with him..As our friends at Plastic Pollution Coalition  tell us:  Plastic Pollution is a health risk. Plastic is Forever.

Read more about the M.A. Bag Bill

 

Posted on 05/15//13

Open Ocean Trading Company's Focus Fish Initiative

Open Ocean Trading Company’s Focus Fish Initiative

W2O wants to support the replenishing of our New England endangered fish population and wants, at the same time, to support our local fishing communities.  Sometimes we feel like the two ideas don’t always easily go hand in hand, especially with the recent quota cuts for fisherman in the Northeast. Some quotas will force fisherman into selling their boats and permits because they just can’t make a decent living with the current restrictions.  Hearing about a new initiative by Open Ocean Trading gives hope that the future of the small boat fisherman will be brighter.  This new Northeast company, Open Ocean Trading (OOT), is working hard to help small boat fisheries keep fishing.

Friend of W2O, Nancy Barrett, Open Ocean Trading’s Director of Business Development describes the Initiative for “Focus Fish:”

Now is the most critical time to keep these small boat fishermen in business. We must work together to preserve the proud and well-known fishing culture that has been woven into Boston and New England history.

Open Ocean Trading believes the solution lies in the supply chain. Everything starts with the fishermen.  They are the foundation of this fragile industry and if they go, the entire system (processors, wholesalers, dealers) will be pulled down with them.  The fish you and I eat will no longer come from our shores but will be imported from overseas via large vessels where fishery management is sometimes absent. If this happens, our seafood might be less traceable, questions will linger about whether it is responsibly harvested, and it might not be a healthy choice for the consumer. We all like to know where our fish is coming from and local seems like the best choice.

Right now, OOT is helping local fishermen survive by creating a new market for previously marginalized species inside the dining halls of universities and colleges in the Northeast.  These fish, now proudly called “Focus Fish,” are the species we need to focus on now-they are the most sustainable choices both for the environment and for our New England local fishing industry.

The beauty of Focus Fish is that it is varies regionally and seasonally. What is responsible to fish for, here, in New England, is different than what people should concentrate their purchasing power on in the mid-Atlantic or on the west coast.  For example, dogfish on the west coast is considered a “red light” species, but here in New England the stocks are rebuilt, and according to recent data, have become an additional stressor to the Atlantic Cod stocks because their bellies are full of juvenile Cod fish!

By creating a market for Focus Fish in colleges and universities, everyone wins – fishermen survive quota cuts and continue fishing, the supply chain avoids collapse, and college students are introduced to new delicious, nutritious, and local species.

OOT recently held a taste test of four New England Focus Fish; Redfish, Dogfish, Pollock, and Hake, at a local campus dining hall. The students surveyed showed that:

  • 88% of the students said they care about where their fish was caught and who caught it
  • 91% felt that having a role in sustaining local community fisheries was somewhat to very important
  • 94% thought the fish they tried was as just as good, better, or much better than fish they were familiar with eating

Wellesley College, located in Massachusetts, was the first school to team up with OOT to bring Focus Fish to their campus. They believed OOT’s forward thinking approach to the fishing industry reflected their own value of innovation and sustainability.

If you are alumni of a school that shares values about sustainability or have a connection to a school that you care about, recommend that they source Focus Fish through Open Ocean Trading and help sustain the fishermen in your area. Schools can use the supply chain that they already have in place, but now they will know exactly where the fish is coming from.  Using OTT makes a real, measurable impact on the industry while supporting local, traceable, nutritious, and delicious seafood.

For more info on Open Ocean Trading: www.openoceantrading.com  and a great video of how a local fisherman uses Open Ocean Trading to maintain a healthy, profitable product: http://www.openoceantrading.com/videos.html 

 

 

Posted on 05/08//13

Leave Only Footprints” transported us to a faraway, magical place where we were immersed in the beauty of an exotic under water world.

Speaking to a sold out audience, photographer Keith Ellenbogen, Randi Rotjan, Ph.D. (New England Aquarium’s Associate Research Scientist), and Heather Tausig ( VP of Conservation, New England Aquarium) provided an inspirational narrative about the Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA).

These incredible story-tellers took us on an educational journey to the remote island nation of Kiribati and introduced us to the untouched and bountiful marine life of The Phoenix Islands. PIPA is one of the largest and most ambitious marine protected areas ever created by a developing country. It is also one of the largest marine protected areas (MPA) in the Pacific Ocean.

Bud Ris with Dr. Teura Toatu, Executive Dir. of The PIPA Trust

Bud Ris with Dr. Teura Toatu, Executive Dir. of The PIPA Trust

 

Thank you to all of you who took action and added ocean preservation to your philanthropic dance card!
More than $12,000 was raised!
Your support of the Phoenix Islands Protected Area
(PIPA) Trust is so very much appreciated!
Here is a wonderful photo of Bud Ris, President and Chief Executive Officer, New England Aquarium and Dr. Teuea Toatu (PIPA Trust Executive Director) acknowledging the gift W2o made possible.

Together we are making a difference!

Posted on 04/29//13

 

The Right Whale

The Right Whale

I love that members and friends are sharing the wonders of the ocean.  Just seems like I have had a day of whale information sent to me.

From our friend and Board Member, Linda Cabot, information from her fab newsletter “From the Bow Seat” highlights the work of 16 year old Noelle Anderson. Check out her fourteen minute film about the Right Whale: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=m6ppjveVxE0.

National Public Radio’s weekly “Living on Earth” series features whales of the New England coast and examines their hunting techniques:http://www.loe.org/shows/segments.html?programID=13-P13-00017&segmentID=7