September, 2016

Posted on 09/22//16

What a relief to finally hear some promising, hopeful and, quite frankly, exciting news about protection for our oceans. September’s headlines about President Obama designating Papahānaumokuākea off of Hawaii and the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts in the Atlantic as National Monuments could not have come at a better time. Every day there is a broadcast, article, or radio commentary about climate change and the devastation taking its toll on our blue planet. Ten years ago information regarding ocean risk was something you searched for in an environmental magazine or maybe the science section of a newspaper. It is telling that the coverage of climate science related to our oceans is now every publication’s front page news.  This hopeful sign signals that conservation groups are no longer “preaching to the choir” and that generations are learning and becoming keenly aware of the importance of protecting our oceans for our future. With his announcement at the Our Ocean Conference, President Obama declared that “The health of our planet’s oceans determine, in large part, the health of our bodies and the health of our economies.”  Thank you President Obama, for putting the health of our oceans on the world stage and for giving us hope that this might be the first wave of more protection of vulnerable marine areas.wapo-ocean-legacy-ad

Posted on 09/15//16

On Thursday, September 15th 2016,  President Barak Obama designated the New England Coral Canyons and Seamounts as a National Marine Monument!  A group of devoted ocean advocates and organizations, including our partners at the New England Aquarium have worked for years for protection of marine habitat in the Atlantic. W2O is proud to have contributed and supported this campaign.

“It is this spectacular ocean wilderness that has plummeting canyons deeper than the Grand Canyon, undersea mountains taller than anything east coast of the Rockies, and sublimely beautiful deep-sea corals that blossom out of the depths and are as ancient as the redwoods,” says Brad Sewell, who oversees work on fisheries and Atlantic Coast issues at the Natural Resources Defense Council in an article from The New York Times.

 

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Photo: NOAA