Lilly Davidson from Libby

Photo: Libby Davidson

With all our worrying world issues, it’s hard to keep climate on our minds. New Years’ resolutions often include topics of health, happiness, wealth, safety and security. Of course, all of these are directly tied to the success of our planet and climate. A healthy planet gives us joy, feeds us, and provides us with our precious natural resources, which dictates economic stability.

Should we be more hopeful about the future of our climate in 2016? Books will be written about whether or not the Paris21 Climate talks will lead to real action for curbing human emissions that contribute to climate change. Arguments will ensue about whether or not we are doing enough, quickly enough, to make an impact. Some will move on in hopes that others will continue the discussion and come up with the answers. But 2016 will be an important climate year and W2O will be encouraging you to stay hopeful and act.

Hashtags are not enough. Sometimes you have to write a letter or make a call to get someone’s attention.  W2O often asks its members and event attendees to write or call their elected government officials to encourage the passing of legislation that protects our oceans. Does it make a difference? According to legislative aids at the Massachusetts State House: Yes! Letters and calls keep topics on the minds of legislators encouraging research that contributes to the process of pushing a bill through to success.

More tips for your action on climate in 2016:

We are often asked, “What can I do?” Here are some tips from the New England Aquarium and the New York Times on how you can help curb carbon emissions:

  • Eat vegetables and cut down on intake of meat and dairy. The production of meat and dairy is carbon intensive.
  • Take the bus, ride a bike or walk.  If you drive to work alone, your commuting eats up more than your entire carbon budget for the year. 
  • Shop wisely, avoid waste.  Wasted food adds to the total amount of the food that is produced.  A large portion of wasted food ends up in landfills and, as it decomposes, adds methane to the atmosphere.
  • Fly less, drive less. Take the train or bus. If you do fly, avoid first class.  On average, a first class seat is two and a half times more detrimental to the environment than coach because it takes up more room resulting in more flights.
  • Reduce your mileage input by driving the speed limit. Tune your engine, keep tires inflated and avoid buying that third car.
  • Buy less stuff; waste less stuff.  Each thing that you recycle is one fewer thing that has to be produced.
  • Advocate public policies that develop clean energy and efficient transportation.  Vote with the oceans in mind.

Good for you. Good for our oceans.