November, 2014

Posted on 11/24//14

DSCN1903At W2O we believe that protecting the oceans is protecting ourselves. Thank you W2O members for attending our events, learning about ocean risk and enabling us to donate thousands of dollars to Marine Protected Areas. Your gifts are saving the oceans and we are thankful.

Read this wonderful article from Thomas Friedman “Stampeding Black Elephants” and be inspired to give back to the environment that sustains, feeds and protects you. Be thankful that, as Mr. Friedman puts it, “The planet will always be here.” But be aware that “This is about us.”

“Protected forests, marine sanctuaries and national parks are not zoos, not just places to see nature. “They are the basic life support systems” that provide the clean air and water, food, fisheries, recreation, stable temperatures and natural coastal protections “that sustain us humans,” said Russ Mittermeier, one of the world’s leading primatologists who attended the World Parks Congress in Sydney last week.”

That’s why “conservation is self-preservation,” says Adrian Steirn, the South Africa-based photographer who also attended the conference.

So, how about you? Tweet and share why you are thankful for all the bounties of the ocean. #howaboutyou.

 

Posted on 11/23//14

Photo credit: Nickolay Lamm and Climate Central

Photo credit: Nickolay Lamm and Climate Central

Though Mayor Menino is surely missed in Boston, his presence was felt strongly at the Sea Level Rise and the Future of Coastal Cities meeting at Boston University last week. Most speakers credited Mayor Menino for bringing them together to engage in the topic of how climate change and the resulting sea level rise will affect cites across the world.

City officials from Helsinki to Melbourne came to collaborate and learn about what cities are doing to increase their resilience to protect their communities with smart design choices involving government, urban planners, developers, the private business sector, academia and scientists. Erika Spanger-Siegfried from the Union of Concerned Scientists explains in a video shown shown at the event that extensive research shows that over the next 30 years, sea levels will increase up to a foot or more in some east coast locations and that when storms occur on top of already typical tidal flooding, higher tides will magnify the risk of severe coastal events.

The conference highlighted the importance of communication between those entities working in different domains, especially from scientist who are learning the language that will be crucial to delivering the message of climate change that causes sea level rise to governments, insurers and the public. “Inherit uncertainties make it harder to make the message clear,” said Bud Ris, past president of the New England Aquarium and a contributor to environmental education and policy around the topic of climate change. But Tony Janetos, director, Fredrick S. Pardee Center for the Studay of the Longer Range Future and co host of the event with the Initiative on Cities, reminded us that “we (scientists) were never trained to communicate this way.” It is an urgent message they are tasked with delivering- one that he says is not that climate change is “50 years out, like we thought” but here faster than we even imagined. “We do not have the luxury to ignore what the science or the experience of others tells us. We must manage the risks while learning more.”

Everyone wants to know, “What will the future hold?” According to Janetos, “it depends on what future we choose.”

*The computer enhanced photo on this page is from a prediction project of the collapse of the Western Antarctic glaciers from Climate Central. Yes, that is the Boston Harbor Hotel. Check out the rest of the photorealistic work depicting iconic places around the globe (and maybe where you live) by photographer Nickolay Lamm.

Posted on 11/16//14

 

Tiny_Giants_Invitation_FINAL

In this exhibit Bigelow Labs  along with the New England Aquarium will present a photographic exhibition of “marine microbes revealed on a grand scale.” Tickets are limited. Come take a closer look at the mystery and beauty of the ocean seen from a microscopic lens. W2O is so excited to host and we look forward to seeing you there!